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    Mitigation and Conservation News

     

    07/23/14 - COLUSA BASIN MITIGATION BANK APPROVED TO SELL GIANT GARTER SNAKE CREDITS

    Located in Colusa County, California, Colusa Basin Mitigation Bank has been approved and the first issue of credits has been released. The 160-acre bank restores habitat for the federally-threatened Giant Garter snake.

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    07/23/14 - WESTERVELT ECOLOGICAL SERVICES RESTORES WETLANDS AND STREAMS IN COOSA RIVER BASIN

    Canoe Creek Mitigation Bank has been approved by agencies to restore wetlands and streams in the Coosa River Basin in St. Clair County, Alabama. The 237-acre mitigation bank is awaiting the first release of credits.

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    05/25/14 - DUTCHMAN CREEK CONSERVATION BANK RECEIVES CDFW AND FWS APPROVAL TO SELL CREDITS

    Dutchman Creek Conservation Bank in Merced County, California, is now approved by the CDFW and FWS to sell credits to compensate for impacts to state and federally-listed species and their habitats.

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    03/27/14 - WETLAND AND STREAM RESTORATION IN THE ALABAMA RIVER BASIN ENHANCED BY MITIGATION BANK

    Alabama River Mitigation Bank (ARMB), a project by private mitigation company Westervelt Ecological Services, has been approved by agencies to restore plant and animal habitat – mostly wetlands and stream rehabilitation – on 971 acres in Wilcox and Monroe Counties. The first issue of credits (Wetland - Bottomland Hardwood and Stream) is now available.

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    04/04/13 - WESTERVELT ECOLOGICAL SERVICES MITIGATION BANK RECEIVES APPROVAL TO SELL CREDITS

    The approval of Meridian Ranch Mitigation Bank by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife adds 377 acres of vernal pool and Swainson’s hawk (Buteo swansoni) habitat to the Northeastern Sacramento Valley Vernal Pool Region.

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    05/14/12 - CBIA Hosts Mitigation Banking Coalition Meeting

    Last week, CBIA played host to over 40 mitigation bank operators and consultants that have recently formed a lobbying coalition seeking to advance legislation this year to create a stable funding source for the Department and a streamlined mitigation bank application process.

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    02/28/12 - Building a Bank Takes More Than Just Snakes

    In an area surrounded by rice fields and flanked by the Sutter bypass, there is a small but fertile area filled with water and plant life, but there are no crops growing here. This land has become a home dedicated to the giant garter snake. The spot in question is the 429-acre Sutter Basin Conservation Bank, created by Westervelt Ecological Services in 2008, and according to U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Biologist Dwight Harvey, "this bank has become one of the best examples of created habitat for the giant garter snake in the Sacramento Valley." What was once agricultural land in an area surrounded by rice and other crops has become much more than that. (US Fish & Wildlife Service - Sacramento Fish & Wildlife Service)

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    01/24/12 - Westervelt Ecological Services Conservation Bank Receives Approval from California Department of Fish and Game

    The California Department of Fish and Game (DFG) has approved the Sutter Basin Conservation Bank in Sutter County California. The bank, owned and managed by Westervelt Ecological Services, preserves and protects over 429 acres of managed marsh and associated upland habitats for the benefit of the Giant Garter Snake (Thamnophis gigas), an endangered and threatened species.

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    08/24/11 - EVENT AT MITIGATION BANK COMPLETES 6000-ACRE ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION

    Sometimes it's good to finish last. At least that's how the team at Westervelt Ecological Services (WES) views completing habitat restoration at Cosumnes Floodplain Mitigation Bank.

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    06/08/11 - Sacramento Tree Foundation Names Westervelt Ecological Services As Legacy Award Winner

    The Sacramento Tree Foundation recognized Westervelt Ecological Services as this year's Legacy Award winner for an Inspirational Oak Grove. Presented at the annual Tree Hero Awards Dinner, the award honors a tree, landscape or woodland and recognizes the innate worthiness of a specific tree or landscape, as well as the beauty and value of these living entities.

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    11/01/10 - FIRST APPROVED RED-LEGGED FROG CONSERVATION BANK IN SIERRA NEVADA A SUCCESS FOR WESTERVELT ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has approved Big Gun Conservation Bank in Michigan Bluff, Placer County, California, to provide mitigation for the California red-legged frog.

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    04/17/10 - WES Staff Participates in Creek Week Clean-Up 2010

    On Saturday, April 17th, WES staff participated in Sacramento Creek Clean-Up 2010. Their efforts included removing non-native plants from Bannon Creek, in Natomas area of Sacramento, CA.

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    01/14/10 - WETLANDS RESTORATION AT GARCON POINT ENHANCED BY MITIGATION BANK

    Pensacola, Fla. – With restoration of plant and animal habitat – mostly wetlands, pine flatwoods, and native prairie – on 1205 acres in Santa Rosa County underway for nearly two years, Pensacola Bay Mitigation Bank (PBMB), a project by private mitigation company Westervelt Ecological Services, has been approved by agencies with the first issue of credits now available.

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    10/09/09 - Wetland habitat to be created in southern Sacramento County

    Riparian forests will be planted and a habitat for salmon created as part of a wetland mitigation bank approved along the Cosumnes River in southern Sacramento County. Westervelt Ecological Services received federal and state approval Sept. 30 to create the 472-acre Cosumnes Floodplain Mitigation Bank. Credits from the bank will be sold to public and private developers to help offset the impacts of construction projects to wetlands. (Business Journal)

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    09/17/09 - GOPHER TORTOISE CONSERVATION BANK ESTABLISHED IN MISSISSIPPI

    Chickasawhay Gopher Tortoise Conservation Bank in Greene County, Mississippi, was the first bank of its kind entitled in Mississippi under new federal guidelines on September 17, 2009. 250 tortoises from Southeast Alabama and Southwest Mississippi will join remnant tortoise over the life of the project to repopulate in a longleaf pine habitat covering 1,220 acres.

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    07/09/09 - How the recession is altering the mitigation banking landscape

    San Francisco, Calif. -- The economic crisis has stifled real estate development and provided a respite to swamps, prairies, and other habitat for endangered species. In the long run, however, it's also hurt green entrepreneurs who are proactively preserving and restoring these habitats to earn offsets for wetland and biodiversity impacts. Ecosystem Marketplace examines the factors that will determine who wins, who loses, and why. (The Katoomba Group's Ecosystem Marketplace)

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    06/21/09 - Westervelt Co. creates mitigation bank to help firms offset developments

    Tuscaloosa, Ala. -- A pine plantation in southeastern Tuscaloosa County soon will see its final harvest. Once the trees are cut, no new pine trees will be neatly planted on the 1,060-acre site near the Duncanville community. The land instead will return to a wild state, with some extra help from humans. (Tuscaloosa News)

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    04/23/09 - Streams and wetlands preserved through mitigation credits in Alabama

    Tuscaloosa, Ala. -- A successful collaborative project in Shelby County has been repeated in Tuscaloosa County, bringing the first mitigation bank to the Black Warrior - Tombigbee River Basin.

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    04/23/09 - Mitigation bank preserves historic cattle ranch

    Sacramento, Calif. -- Stan Van Vleck, owner and operator of 150 year-old Van Vleck Ranch, has spent years struggling to maintain a historic cattle operation in the face of modern economic pressures. Inheritance and transfer taxes, rising property taxes, and encroachment by urban development has threatened the ranch's operational outlook.

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