Blog

14
Sep
2012

Calling All Dusky Gopher Frogs

In a recent report released by the Society of London and the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the world’s 100 most endangered species are presented.  Of all the species that made the list, the Dusky gopher frog, Lithobates sevosus is the only mainland U.S. species in the report.  Ironically, it is found in the

read more

31
Aug
2012

Field Report

The Humor of Working in the Field Due to the nature of our business here at Westervelt Ecological Services we tend to spend a fair amount of time in the field.  On a daily basis, our crew can be found, trudging along through fields and sloughs – mapping, monitoring and mowing along the way.  It’s

read more

31
Jul
2012

Counting Plants

Monitoring at Cosumnes Floodplain Mitigation Bank During the winter of 2010/2011 Westervelt Ecological Services planted over 9,000 plants at our Cosumnes Floodplain Mitigation Bank.  Tidal channel banks were planted with pole cuttings of willows (Salix lasiolepis, S. laevigata, S. lasiandra), Fremont cottonwood, Buttonwillow, and Oregon ash to accelerate near water cover.  Floodplain Riparian Habitat was

read more

18
Jul
2012

Construction Season at Westervelt Ecological Services

Worker Environmental Awareness Program (WEAP) Its construction season here at Westervelt Ecological Services and with every construction project WES starts with a WEAP.  No, we aren’t passing around a box of Kleenex, WEAP stands for Worker Environmental Awareness Program.  It’s a program used to educate personnel about the existing on-site and surrounding biological, cultural and

read more

11
Jul
2012

Photo Points at Pensacola Mitigation Bank

Capturing photo points on our mitigation banks is a useful way to highlight restoration success. The photos below were taken at Pensacola Bay Mitigation Bank where we are restoring hardwood and pine flatwood landscapes.  The top photos in each grouping were taken in 2008 and the bottom photos were taken in the spring of 2012.

25
May
2012

Cogongrass: El Diablo Verde

Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrical) is an ever-present threat to not only our mitigation banks in Alabama, Florida and Mississippi, but most banks in the southeast. A native grass of Korea, Japan, China, India, and tropical eastern Africa, it is nonnative and invasive throughout the southeastern United States. Cogongrass grows in dense patches, up to six feet

read more